Upcoming Events


Our aim is to publish stimulating, well-written, authoritative peer-reviewed articles on all topics relevant to these broad fields. It is consciously eclectic and diverse in its range of content: works (ancient and modern); in all languages and literatures; and is open to a broad interpretation of text, media, art and culture.  It serves a wide cross-section of interests and backgrounds, enabling us to place a priority on clear writing and readability. The book volumes will be international in focus and content, and attract contributors from universities on sociology, communication, art, media, and development studies, languages and literatures, in addition to international relations.

 
STUDIES IN LANGUAGES, LITERATURES, ARTS AND MEDIA SCIENCES:

A BOOK COLLECTION, VOL.1 January 2020

EDITOR: AFUTENDEM LUCAS NKWETTA

IN COLLABORATION WITH


*Dschang School of Arts and Social Sciences,
*African and Diaspora Studies Research Laboratory
*Pathfinders Research Laboratory Association in English and Commonwealth Studies Group.
                       
SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE
Paul Mbangwana, Professor Emeritus, (University of Dschang)
Beban Sammy Chumbow, Professor Emeritus, (University of Dschang)
Daniel Nkemleke, Professor, (University of Yaounde 1)
Chief Professor Nol Alembong, Professor,  (University of Buea)
Esaie Djomo, Professor, (University of Dschang)
Albert Gouaffo, Professor, (University of Dschang)
Robert Fotsing Mangua, Professor, (University of Dschang)
Stephen Mforteh, Professor, (University of Yaounde 1)
Kizitus Mpoche, Professor, (University of Douala)
Jean Paul Kouega, Professor, (University of Yaounde 1)
John Nkemngong Nkengasong, Professor, (University of Yaoounde 1)
Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Professor, (University of Dschang)
Nforbi Emmanuel, Associate Professor, (University of Dschang)
Teke Charles Ngiewih, Associate Professor (University of Yaounde 1)  
Aloysius Nguefac, Associate Professor (University of Yaounde 1)
Lem Lilian Atanga, Associate Professor, (University of Dschang)
Samuel Atechi, Associate Professo,(University of Yaounde 1)
Emmanuel Nforbi, Associate Professor, (University of Dschang)
Louis Bertin Amougou, Associate Professor, (University of Dschang)
Jean Bernoit Tsofack, Associate Professor, (University of Dschang)
Ngetcham Ngetcham, Associate Professor, (University of Dschang)
Lasdislas Nzesse, Associate Professor, (University of Dschang)
Nforbi Emmanuel, Associate Professor, (University of Dschang)
Mbuh Tennu Mbuh, Associate Professor, (University of Bamenda)
Adamu Pangmeshi, Associate Professor, (University of Bamenda)
Camilla Arundie  Tabe, Senior Lecturer,  (University of Maroua)

Aims and Scope
Studies in Languages, Literatures, Arts and Media is a multidisciplinary book to be published in Volumes, dealing with research papers in Sciences of Languages, Literatures, Arts and Media studies. Our aim is to publish stimulating, well-written, authoritative peer-reviewed articles on all topics relevant to these broad fields. It is consciously eclectic and diverse in its range of content: works (ancient and modern); in all languages and literatures; and is open to a broad interpretation of text, media, art and culture.  It serves a wide cross-section of interests and backgrounds, enabling us to place a priority on clear writing and readability. The book volumes will be international in focus and content, and attract contributors from universities on sociology, communication, art, media, and development studies, languages and literatures, in addition to international relations. The book seeks papers in these four sections:


Articles or Chapters
We are contented with well researched articles, clear and coherent that probe new areas mentioned in the aim and scope above. They should interrogate existing theoretical constructions, advance new thinking and refreshing departure from outdated discourses based on traditional boundaries between disciplines. Essays in this category should be between 6000 and 8000 words.

Forum
We need essays that are engaging, thoughtful, provocative and controversial. They should be the opinions of the scholars dissatisfied with existing discourses and who seek to generate debates among intellectuals. They should be no more than 3000 words.

Tribute
In this section, we will be pleased to have essays that highlight the achievements of senior scholars, intellectuals and professionals who have attained high feats in the field of Languages, Literatures, Arts and Media Studies. Tributes must not be sentimental and emotional and should focus on the specific contributions of the personalities to scientific knowledge. Essays in this category should not be more than 3000 words.


Creative Corner
We will be pleased to have creative works: short stories, and short plays of not more than 3000 words and poems of not more than 50 lines. Originality is our prime concern here.


Instructions for Authors

Thank you for choosing to submit your paper to us. These instructions will ensure we have everything required so your paper can move through peer review, production and publication smoothly. Please take the time to read and follow them as closely as possible, as doing so will ensure your paper matches the journal's requirements.

Peer Review


We are committed to peer-review integrity and upholding the highest standards of review. Once your paper has been assessed for suitability by the editor, it will then be double blind peer reviewed by independent, anonymous expert referees.

Preparing Your Paper                                                                                                 

Structure

Your paper should be compiled in the following order: title page; abstract; keywords; main text introduction, materials and methods, results, discussion; references; appendices (as appropriate); table(s) with caption(s) (on individual pages); figures; figure captions (as a list).

 

Word Limits


A typical article for this journal should be between 6000 and 8000 words, inclusive of tables, references, figure captions.  

 

Style Guidelines


Please use British spelling style or French (France) consistently throughout your manuscript.

 

Formatting and Templates


Papers may be submitted in Word. Figures should be saved separately from the text.

 

References


Checklist: What to Include


  1. Author details. All authors of a manuscript should include their full name and affiliation on the cover page of the manuscript. Where available, please also include ORCiDs and social media handles (Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn). One author will need to be identified as the corresponding author, with their email address normally displayed in the article (depending on the journal) and the online article. Authors’ affiliations are the affiliations where the research was conducted. If any of the named co-authors moves affiliation during the peer-review process, the new affiliation can be given as a footnote..
  2. Should contain an unstructured abstract of 300 words.
  3. Graphical abstract (optional). This is an image to give readers a clear idea of the content of your article. It should be a maximum width of 525 pixels. If your image is narrower than 525 pixels, please place it on a white background 525 pixels wide to ensure the dimensions are maintained. Save the graphical abstract as a .jpg, .png, or .gif..
GUIDELINES FOR CONTRIBUTORS/STYLE SHEET
Notwithstanding the fact you may be writing in literature, language, film, culture or art and other humanities, in the final paper, and where appropriate, you should make sure that:
1.      The background introduces a specific question and spells out objectives on the basis of a description of general and specific issues. It should also contain relevant research questions and hypotheses.
2.      The methods section provides sufficient information on design, sampling, definitions, data collection methods and data analysis.
3.      The results section reports sound scientific data that meet the objectives. There are enough details and adequate statistical information.
4.      The discussion section interprets the results to build a case on the basis of the data presented and the literature.
5.      The limitations are described and analysed so that their impact on the capacity to conclude are well understood.
6.      The paper suggests next steps in terms of intervention and gathering additional evidence on the basis of the evidence presented.
7.      The design is adequate to meet the objectives.
8.      The population is well defined and relevant to the objectives.
9.      Definitions are specified, sound and based upon standardized criteria when available.
10.  Sampling methods are statistically sound and adapted.
11.  The sample size was estimated beforehand appropriately and is adequate.
12.  The design is exempt from bias. The data that were collected are well described and relevant.
13.  The language is simple and clear. The writing is sequential, going from one point to the next.
14.  There are no more than five relevant and useful tables and or figures. The tables are clear, exact and the totals add up.
Above all, the Contributions should be submitted by e-mail as MS Word files (.doc)  to afutendem@yahoo.com, website www.afutendem.com
  1.  Contributions should include the title, name of the author, university affiliation,  electronic address, key words up to 5, abstract and references)
  2. ·      Article length: 12-17 standard pages (6000-8000 words) including references and endnotes
  3. All tables, graphs and pictures should be in MS Word format, ordered numerically and have a caption underneath the table, graph or picture
  4. The contribution should be divided into appropriate sections and subsections. Each section or subsection should have a suitable heading numbered with Arabic numerals (e.g. 1; 1.1; 1.1.1).
  5. The headings should be in boldface with capital letters on the first word and on proper nouns only
  6. Copyright matters are the responsibility of the authors
  7.  Use Times New Roman font family, font size 12, 1.5 line height
  8.  Title should be in BOLD CAPITALS
  9.  Section headings should be in bold and numbered
  10. Avoid using notes, if necessary, use end-of-text notes rather than footnotes
  11.  Use double quotes, single quotes are to be used only when enclosed in double quotes and for linguistic definitions
  12.  Paragraphs should be indented, do not leave a blank line between paragraphs
  13.  "I", "we", "our" should only be used rarely in a research document. The writing needs to be objective and impersonal and in the third person unless otherwise stated in the assignment guidelines. It is also preferred that students not refer to themselves in the third person.
  14. Always spell out a number in words if it begins a sentence.
  15. Generally spell out the numbers one through ten in words. Use figures for numbers above ten unless they begin a sentence.
  16. Capitalize each word in the titles of articles, books, etc, but do not capitalize articles (the, an), prepositions, or conjunctions unless one is the first word of the title or subtitle: Gone with the Wind, The Art of War, There Is Nothing Left to Lose.
  17. Use italics (instead of underlining) for titles of larger works (books, magazines) and quotation marks for titles of shorter works (poems, articles)
  18.    Abbreviations should be used sparingly and precisely
           
Please do NOT:
·       Use varying styles in the MS Word document. Restrict the use of different font sizes and line heights to the minimum
·        Use line breaks at the ends of lines
·        Use the spacebar for aligning paragraphs and text positioning. Use the tabulator instead
·        Include anything in the header section

Referencing

In-text citation:
Simpson (1985: 317)
Books:
Simpson, Peter. (2004) Stylistics. London and New York: Routledge.

More than one work by an author

If you have cited more than one work by a particular author, order the entries alphabetically by title, and use ________ in place of the author's name for every entry after the first:
Burke, Kenneth. A Grammar of Motives. [...]
________ A Rhetoric of Motives. [...]
Journal articles:
Widdowson, Hans. (2000) On the limitations of linguistics applied. Applied Linguistics 21/1, 3-25.
Article from a Collection:
Foucault, Michel. 1977. “What Is an Author?” In Language, Counter-Memory, Practice: Selected Essays and Interviews, ed. Donald F. Bouchard and trans. Donald F. Bouchard and Sherry Simon, 113–138. Ithaca.
Article in an Internet database:
Hovy, E. H. (1995) The Multifunctionality of Discourse Markers. In: Proceedings of the Workshop on Discourse Markers. Egmond-aan-Zee, The Netherlands, Jan 1995. Online document. 11 July 2005 <http://www.isi.edu/~hovy/>.
 Citing an e-book from an e-reader
Author, A.A.. (Year of Publication). Title of work [E-Reader Version]. Retrieved from http://xxxx or doi:xxxx

How to Cite a Movie/Film 

Producer, A.A. (Producer), & Director, A.A. (Director). (Release Year). Title of motion picture [Motion Picture]. Country of Origin: Studio

Citing an episode from TV or radio show

Kang, K. (Writer), & Fryman, P. (Director). (2006). Slap bet [Television series episode]. In Bays, C. (Executive Producer), How I met your mother Los Angeles, CA: Columbia Broadcasting System.



No comments

Powered by Blogger.